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DUI and the Holidays in Dothan Alabama

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The holiday season is upon us and it can be one of the most relaxing times of the year, especially if you get to take time off from work and spend it with family and friends. It can also be a dangerous time of the year. Thousands of DUI accidents occur across the country during the holiday season. According to the U.S. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 40 percent of deaths related to traffic crashes during Christmas and New Year’s Day are caused by drunk drivers. This is an increase of 12 percent from the rest of the month of December. This makes the holiday season one of the most dangerous seasons every year for drivers.

Deaths Caused by Holiday DUIs

The holiday season, extending from Thanksgiving to well after New Year’s Day, is one of the most dangerous times for drivers across the country. The sheer increase in the volume of traffic on the roads adds to the danger. Couple that with the increase in driving under the influence occurrences and you are taking your life in your hands when you get behind the wheel.

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, roughly 300 people die each year between Christmas and New Year’s Day because of drunk driving accidents. On top of that statistic, an average of 27 people die per day in December because of DUI crashes. The statistics are even more sobering when you look at the nationwide annual numbers. More than 10,000 people die in DUI crashes annually in the United States.

An Increase in Alcohol Consumption

It’s common knowledge that there is an increase in alcohol consumption during the holiday season. Drive past any restaurant or bar during the holiday season and you will have trouble finding a parking spot. Wait times for a table are usually double and some places are shut down due to overcapacity. There are a slew of holiday office parties, family holiday parties, get togethers with friends and plenty of other events that serve alcohol.

According to PsychCentral, the holiday season is when people who don’t normally drink or who don’t have a high tolerance for alcohol tend to consume and then drive. At the same time, PsychCentral said that people who have serious drinking problems tend to drink even more because everyone around them is drinking alcohol.

Avoiding DUI During the Holidays

Heading out for an office party or other event during the holiday season can be stressful. It can also wind up ending in disaster if you have too much to drink and then get behind the wheel. The best option for avoiding a DUI charge is to refrain from driving if you are going to a party and know you will be drinking. There are plenty of rideshare options available, as well as Taxi services. You can also request that someone with you bring you home if they have not been drinking. If you plan to drink when not at home you should make transportation plans before you leave for the party.

Some people follow an old rule known as the one drink per hour rule. This rule seems to work for most people who are going to a party, want to have a drink, and still want to drive home. Having just one drink per hour, mixed in with either water or soda, can help prevent inebriation. This rule doesn’t always work for everyone, especially if you have low body weight, low metabolism, and haven’t eaten much food during the party.

If you find yourself driving to an event and then drinking too much, make sure you hand your keys to someone who can be trusted with them. It’s safer to leave your vehicle in the parking lot overnight than it is to get behind the wheel. A friend or family member can always take you in the morning to pick up your vehicle once you’ve sobered up enough to drive.

Contact an Experienced Attorney

Were you charged with DUI this holiday season? Are you worried that the charge will wind up costing you time in jail? It’s time for you to speak with an experienced criminal defense attorney in Alabama about your situation. Call the office of Smith & McGhee to schedule a consultation at 334-702-1744. The office is