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Possible consequences of weapons crimes in Alabama

When people think about weapon crimes, many picture firearms, but in Alabama weapons offenses could involve other weapons just as easily. Like other states, Alabama has several strict laws in place to control such weapons while helping keep the population safe from harm. Weapon aficionados would do well to understand these laws in order to avoid initial weapons charges and the consequences that come with a conviction.

Below you will find a few common weapon offenses and the possible penalties associated with a conviction.

Carrying a Concealed Weapon: Without possessing the required special permission, it is against the law to carry concealed weapons. Upon conviction, the defendant may face penalties such as a fine of $50 to $500, a jail sentence or hard labor.

Fighting in Public with Firearms: Unless the firearm is used in self-defense, the defendant could face a fine of between $200 and $500 as well as a possible jail sentence or hard labor.

Selling Weapons to Minors: Those convicted of selling, giving or lending weapons like knives or guns to minors will be fined between $50 and $500.

Carrying Concealed Slingshots or Brass Knuckles: As with the traditional concealed weapons, a defendant convicted of carrying and concealing either of these will have to pay a fine of up to $500 along with a possible jail term or hard labor.

Carrying a Rifle or Shotgun Cane: Considered some of the more serious weapons offenses, convictions typically result in costly fines of between $500 and $1,000 in addition to a sentence of no less than two years in the state prison.

As you can see, Alabama takes a severe stance against weapons crimes. Even defendants who broke these laws accidentally will likely face serious charges. The best course of action immediately following an arrest for a weapon-related crime is to speak with a defense attorney and ask for help.

Source: Alabama Attorney General’s Office, “Alabama’s Firearms and Weapons Law,” accessed May. 21, 2015

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